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tv   U.S. House of Representatives Legislative Business  CSPAN  February 29, 2016 6:00pm-7:01pm EST

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agencies to appoint political appointees and former political appointees to nonpolitical civil service positions. mr. speaker, s. 1172 will help ensure the incoming president has the information necessary to oversee our complex government. together, these commonsense steps will support future presidents as they prepare to govern immediately after inauguration. regardless of party, key management actions must be taken during transitions to support the smooth operation of government. mr. speaker, this bill was also referred to the committee on homeland security and we deeply appreciate their cooperation in getting this bill to the floor. i ask unanimous consent to enter our letter exchange with the committee on homeland security into the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, that will be included in the record.
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mr. hice: i also would like to thank senators johnson and carper for their work to ensure the upcoming transition remains nonpartisan and supports the continuance of essential government operations. mr. speaker, as we prepare for an upcoming presidential transition, i urge my colleagues to support this important, bipartisan legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from illinois is recognized. the gentlewoman is recognized for such time. >> i rise in support of this legislation. i appreciate the leadership of senator tom carper in advocating for this bill, which would improve the transition process for presidential administrations. ms. kelly: when a new president takes office, it can take months for the new administration to put people in place. this bill would ensure that the federal government can continue its important functions during this transition and allow the head of an agency out if career
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employees in noncareer positions temporarily if necessary. under this legislation, a senior-level interagency transition council would be established to help develop an effective strategy for each presidential transition. the general services administration would also be required to designate a federal transition coordinator, and agencies would be required to designate senior career officials to oversee transition activities. this bill would also help the national archives carry out its mission by authorizing the president to include funds for the archives, to efficiently receive records from the outgoing administration. several changes were made to this legislation during consideration by the oversight committee, to address concerns raised by ranking member cummings. for example, the senate version of this bill would have required the office of personnel management to report every quarter on requests for political appointees to convert
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to career employees. the bill before us today would still require o.p.m. to report this information, but it would only be on an annual basis during nonelection years. this bill will help future presidents and have a smooth and productive -- presidents have a smooth and productive transition. i support this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. hice: i have no further speakers and i am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is prepared to close. the gentlelady from illinois is recognized. to close debate for the minority. ms. kelly: mr. speaker, i have no additional speakers and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. hice: mr. speaker, i urge adoption of the bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia yields back. all time having now expired on this bill, the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass senate bill 1172 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no.
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in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? mr. hice: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass s. 1580, the competitive service act of 2015, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 1580, an act to allow additional appointing authorities to select individuals from competitive service certificates. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from georgia and the gentlewoman from illinois each will control 20 minutes. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from georgia. mr. hice: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume and ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore:
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without objection, so ordered. and the gentleman is now recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. hice: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of s. 1580, the competitive service act of 2015, introduced by senator john tester of montana. this bill would allow federal agencies to share their lists of best qualified candidates with other agencies needing to hire for similar positions. mr. speaker, many applicants are reluctant to apply for jobs with the federal government, due to the length of time it takes for some agencies to fill job announcements. this bill will expedite the federal hiring process by allowing agencies to share their assessment of job applicants for competitive service positions. s. 1580 allows an agency to hire from another agency's certified list of eligible candidates as long as the original job announcement provided notice that the list of eligible candidates may be
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used by another agency and that the position is in the same occupational category and that the position is at a similar grade level. however, before an agency can hire from another agency's certified list of eligible candidates, that agency must provide notice of the available position to its internal employees, give up to 10 business days for its employees to submit applications, and then consider those applications. s. 1580 provides that as long as all of these requirements are met, an agency does not need to make any additional postings and may hire from the list of certified eligible candidates. in an april, 2014, report titled, you new civil service framework -- a new civil service framework, it discussed allowing agents to share those best qualified candidates with other agencies. p.p.s. notes that crediting
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cross-agency best qualified applicant pools is, quote, another commonsense opportunity to create enterprise-wide efficiencies for the federal government, end quote. with the federal government looking to fill critical vacancies, this bill will assist agencies with recruiting and hiring much needed talent in areas such as cybersecurity and information technology. mr. speaker, the committee received letters of support for this legislation from the professional managers association and the partnership for public service and the federal managers association also supported this bill, calling it commonsense legislation. i want to thank senator tester for this legislation. the house has a similar bill that was introduced by representatives connolly and witman and i want to thank them all for bringing this matter to the attention of the committee as well. mr. speaker, as we move forward with legislation to make the federal government more effective and efficient, i urge
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my colleagues to support this important bipartisan legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from illinois is recognized. ms. kelly: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. kelly: mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of s. 1580, the competitive service act of 2015. i commend senators tester and portman and other colleagues in the senate for their leadership on this important legislation. i also want to thank my friend and colleague, congressman connolly of virginia, for his work on this bill, and introducing the companion bill in the house. s. 1580 is a commonsense measure to streamline the federal government's hiring process. the legislation would reduce duplication in the vetting of candidates for federal jobs by allowing agencies to share their lists of best qualified candidates with other agencies who are hiring for a similar position.
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under this bill, an agency may hire an individual from another agency's certified list of candidates without any additional job posting, if the agency meets certain requirements, including notify its employees of the available position -- notifying its employees of the available position and allowing them to apply. i urge my colleagues to join me in voting in favor of this legislation. thank you, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. hice: mr. chairman, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from virginia who has been a major player in this legislation, i yield two minutes to mr. wittman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for two minutes. mr. wittman: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to thank the gentleman from georgia for yielding and thank you for his -- thank him for his leadership. as you've heard, this is just a commonsense bill. and i rise in strong support of s. 1580, the competitive services act. i want to thank my colleague from virginia, jerry connolly, for his effort, along with my
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staff in putting together this house version of this bill. it's just a commonsense, bicameral, bipartisan bill that allows agencies in a very complex and competitive world to aggressively and timely recruit individuals for these positions. we want to get individuals into those positions quickly. we want to understand where the talent lies so that these agencies can communicate back and forth many times -- forth, many times that silo approach doesn't work. that breaks down these silos and allows the agencies to share information about these applicants. in today's world, when we need to in a timely way get folks into the cybersecurity realm, we need to get folks into the information technology realm, and even in the veterans health care realm, where we need to get health care providers there quickly, especially when there's demand, this is the perfect way to do that. when we go through the effort of having these individuals apply for these jobs, we know what their qualifications are. there's no reason why we
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shouldn't be sharing this information. it allows us to act in the best interest of taxpayers, it cuts down on the amount of expense that's put forth in recruiting these individuals. and it assures that we get things done on time. and we understand too the talent pool that's out there. many times if you look at it and say, these are the individuals that are available, and even if there's a challenging getting somebody, you can -- a challenge in getting somebody, you can meetly see that instead of waiting and saying, well, it doesn't look like we have the number of individuals that we need, what's the next course of action? this allows us to get through all of those particular issues, get people in these positions as quickly as possible. and it's just a commonsense piece of legislation that allows our managers to manage in the most effective way possible, allows us to do the best job for our country. it allows the best use of taxpayer dollars, and i urge my colleagues to support s. 150 and i yield back the balance of my time. -- 1580 and i yield back the
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balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from illinois is recognized. ms. kelly: mr. speaker, i have no additional speakers. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized to close debate. mr. hice: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers and am prepared to close. i urge adoption of this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. all time having now expired on this legislation, the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass senate bill 1580 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house
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in recess until approximately 6:30 p.m. today.
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their last that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks minute pitches. organization is key but it has moved to a very different level where the candidates hope they people can rs are
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call in and ask questions. there is nothing better than talking to voters especially in the states where primaries and caucuses. how solid is your support. you get a sense of the pulse of america. and the other networks have their pundits and analysts and people can question their reporters, but the best pundits ho are tuning on c-span. >> justice clarence thomas broke 10 years of silence when he posed questions. the "chicago tribune" writes
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that the questions had audible gasps about a federal law that people who are convicted from owning guns. he wanted to know if breaking a law suspends the constitutional ights. >> we take a look at the u.s. nuclear stockpile in what is needed to maintain that stockpile and what is meant for the future. joining us is aaron metha. thank you for joining us. can you tell us why we still have a nuclear-based stockpile as it is? guest: the argument that is put forward from proponents is essentially, look at russia and china. they are not getting rid of their nuclear weapons anytime soon. that is something we need to maintain our edge on. it is called x essential issue
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for the u.s. military to be able to match up with these countries and show that if there is ever a nuclear fight, the u.s. will come out ahead. about 7100 nuclear weapons, russia has about 7700 and there is falloff from their. guest: under the new treaty, those numbers will come down. the argument is that you can do a lot of damage with 7500 or 4000 or 1000 nuclear weapons. what is the appropriate cap? when dealing with the money needed to maintain these weapons, what areas are we talking about? guest: the congressional budget organization came out and said that over the next 10 years, the project the nuclear arsenal costs about $350 billion. that number will go up pretty high on average in the 20 20's.
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other groups have come out, one think tank says it will be about 70 -- $700 billion in the next 25 years. was a group inside the department of energy which handles the development, production, design of the actual new warhead. those delivery systems are the icbms, the bombers, the air controlled cruse missiles and the navy submarines. the issue that is coming up right now is that all of these systems are essentially edging out over the next 15 years to get to the point were those systems are replaced, various services in the pentagon have to begin spending the money now in designing systems and get them under way. that has been seen as an opportunity from the nonproliferation crowd to go at them and say do need all of these systems? there are various cases being made and you are seeing this layout in the hill. host: in the next 10 years, is
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it just replacing the systems to launch on -- or the missiles themselves? guest: it is both. the nsa is trying to combine various warheads down to about five different variants. that will also cost several billions of dollars. will talk about those delivery systems and the u.s. nuclear stockpile, the money needed to maintain those. guests, if you have questions, you can call (202) 748-8001 four republicans. (202) 748-8000 for democrats. (202) 748-8002 for independents. list,.o down the and then we can talk specifics $160 billion price tag across the middle east. give us specifics, one we
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talking about as far as the actual delivery systems? guest: the first one is the navy's replacement for the ohio class submarine. if you have seen movies that in the case of a nuclear war would want -- lunch nuclear missiles from underwater, that is the first bill that will come due. a newnvolves building reactor, actual submarines, designing the systems. host: -- commonly referred to as the ohio class. technologies,ew they will have less of them than they currently have. it will be stealthier, more capable, more weapons. -- it becomes less about the nuclear capabilities and more about the fact that the systems are old and they have to be replaced if that part of the
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so-called nuclear triad is going to remain. used thatis a term refers to the fact that there are basically three ways that nuclear weapons could be icbm.red, by air, sea or host: how much of that triad is sea-based? guest: the icbms are the biggest numbers. the submarine force is important because it is considered -- it is the one you would put in the pacific to hold china accountable and let them know that there are systems near the territory. host: are they always loaded with weapons and to continually move around? guest: it is rotational. if there is a need for a presence, they will send one. in some cases, they will let the countries know they are there because the point of all nuclear weapons in the u.s. is deterrence. the goal is to remind everyone
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in the world that we have these things and we have the capability to hold him accountable if you tried to be a bad actor. the submarines are interesting because in some ways, it is the hidden part of the triad. it is the force that you don't know where it is. in other ways, the point that you don't know where it is and you know -- and we know that is kind of the core of the whole idea. host: we will talk more about the systems as we continue with our discussion. numbers will be on your screen if you want to ask questions. let's start with judy in virginia. caller: thank you. i grew up in the cold war. the thing that horrifies me most is nuclear war. what horrifies me is that when we develop the atomic weapons and dropped it on nice psyche and hiroshima -- on nagasaki and
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hiroshima, we did not have television yet. telephone operators were still transferring calls by manually plugging into control boards. hands, in hold in our paul pilots or anything like a bank ofpower that computers used to have in the 1950's. there are hydrogen weapons, neutron weapons which are a lot more expensive. therelse could be out that we are up against, because we certainly have to maintain our defense and i think we have to upgrade our weaponry. from what i understand, the russians have gone down because their missiles are more accurate. they have gone down to kill a tonnage as opposed to make a atonnage.- meg
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what can we do to defend against this and what do we need because certainly, we have to be number one in this. ,uest: i think the answer is you see a lot of investment coinciding with the kind of new nuclear non--- modernization that has been the focus of the last few years. something like a nuclear strike is going to be a priority. this is where things like cyber come into play. the u.s. has the capacity to do a cyber attack against a nation that could potentially stop something like this from happening. the best determined from a nuclear war or attack is generally going to be a mix of diplomacy and of the actual u.s. deterrent, knowing that any country that would strike the u.s. would be responded to in kind from this mix of capabilities. the enemy will necessarily know where they are at any given time. host: washington, d.c., trevor,
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democrat. drop the whole playful euphemisms of deterrence and response? so we are talking about is genocide and mass murder. i visited the titan missile site that was turned into a museum and what struck me was, there are no plans for the people who lost that missile to survive. it was the subject of jokes among the operators. this is annihilation. given that our real threat nuclear weapons is a symmetrix, people who we can't to deter with mass murder and mass annihilation. isn't it insane to incentivize our potentially unstable states like russia and pakistan to build more nuclear weapons, which could potentially end up in the hands of someone who wishes to use them? guest: that is the core of the
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argument from the arms control association and groups similar to that, that essentially the more the u.s. invests in nuclear weapons, the more likely it is other nations will do the same in the creates the potential for a rogue actor to lay hands on nuclear weapons. russia and the u.s. lead by magnitudes, the world in terms of numbers of actual weapons. the counter you hear from the pentagon or congress to support this action is essentially, russia and china both said they will continue to invest in their arsenal. if we don't do the same, we will fall behind and be held at this asymmetric advantage. frankly, your argument falls down on where you believe whether nuclear weapons should never be used again or not. guest: aside from russia -- host: aside from russia and china, who is the next biggest threat? guest: threat wise, those are the existential threats, several
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u.s. allies have nuclear weapons. north korea is the big wildcard in all of this. exactly what capabilities they have is unclear, at least to the public. they have demonstrated in the last couple of months a willingness to show that they have these weapons and of a have some capabilities. it is unclear if they could really strike the u.s. or not, but a good certainly strike u.s. allies in the region. in thoses iran change it -- in that list because of the agreements that have been made? guest: according to the agreement, they will not have nuclear weapons, that was the whole impetus was to eliminate them as a nuclear armed state. host: john from new jersey, caller: thank you very much. since the vast majority of people in this world in this piece, isn't it time for our leaders to take the lead and get all the other
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leaders of the world to sit down in a common sense conference and stop this altogether, to stop this proliferation completely. this should go to a public referendum in the united states and save hundreds of billions of dollars to go to something useful and life enhance thing rather than destruction and the moral courage is there in our leaders. this could get done. think that is in some ways what the new start is about. interesting the number of candidates who have been asked about this on the campaign trail , several from struck out over the course of last year, asked about how you feel about nuclear weapons and almost all of them said at some point, i would like
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to see the world at zero nuclear weapons. that is not a realistic goal. theink that is shared by administration and others. the focus has become more about getting numbers down. there is a sense that is not a realistic goal in this world now. host: we showed you the $160 billion estimated price tag, about 8 billion dollars for tactical systems, $80 billion for weapons laboratories and $62 billion for command and control. specifically because of sequestration? to what degree. >> this is the long tail of sequestration in budget caps. the pentagon would essentially have as much money as it wanted and while this would be a big price tag, everything would be fine for them.
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under the budget cap proposed by sequestration, you have a money is where tighter. how tight is the matter of argument, a slush fund by critics. the issue the pentagon is having and they are speaking openly about this, purst to clae 8 ofule 20, thenfinhed buness the voton the mnf gentmaontucky, . whfield, toend the ruls the yeasaywere ordered. th clerk will report the of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 4238, a bill to amend the department of energy organization act and the local public works capital development and investment act of 1976, to modernize terms relating to minorities. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote.
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[captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 376, the nays are zero. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: the ouse will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to speak out of order for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> i gather today to gather from the va delegation and south carolina delegation, mississippi and louisiana and we would like to take this opportunity who lost their lives that ravaged the gulf coast. our prayers and deep think are with the loved ones that lost
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their lives after the tornado that ripped through waiverly, virginia. our thoughts and prayers are with those who were altered by this storm. as communities, we extend our deep gratitude, first responders and emergency personnel and their response ell. we are proud not priced by the way citizens and those across the east coast are expressing their support. . in me in a moment of silence and the communities and across virginia, south carolina, mississippi and louisiana who have been impacted. the speaker pro tempore: members will please rise for a moment of
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silence. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise to honor the life of officer ashley gliden. a law enforcement officer and marine corps reserve veteran who answered the call to serve our community and our country and he
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was a guardian and willing to step into the breach to protect others. 27, n saturday, february one day, one day, mr. speaker after officer gliden was sworn in as an officer, the prince william county police department did just that while responding to a call from a domestic violence. he was shot and killed by a gunman who has taken the life of his loving mother. i ask that my colleagues in joining me in mourning for the paying tribute to gliff more in this world than they ever asked in return. we pray for their safety. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seeks recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> i rise today on rare disease day and to advocate for those who are impacted. a medical condition is rare if 200,000 people are known to be living with that disease and affects a small population with 7,000 diseases that fall into category, rare diseases are not uncommon. i want to commend our researchers at the n.i.h. and in my district and the u.s. who have risen. ese men and women are on the medical breakthrough and they deserve our full support. so do the parents, advocates and
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those afflicted who spend their time raising awareness on issues impabbletting rare diseases, there is much left to be accomplished. tested and approved for general use, countless other diseases have been discovered. that's why the house has taken the step by passing the 21st rare diseases cure act and on this rare disease day and let us remember that the stakes are high. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from nebraska seek recognition? without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today saddened by the passing of a true public servant, dr.
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washington, the long time publisher of the "omaha star. news.used on printing when she succeeded her aunt in running the paper, she carried this responsibility for over three decades making the landmark. she was a robust and principal voice for social justice. she enlightened the public on a variety of matters including health care, jobs and education. her advocacy has awards and recognition by this body and the congressional record. she devoted her life and the impact of her efforts will endure for generations to come. may god bless her. may comfort for all those who
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mourn. the speaker pro tempore: jabts. the gentleman from washington seek recognition? >> permission to address the ouse for one minute. mr. olson: mr. speaker, last saturday, early afternoon, two beautiful words rang out, play ball! . the 2016 first con luis had the gun. all the players are special. but one group stands out, called the dream league. this is sovene nine for the dream league. 100 more players with physical and intellectual challenges play baseball. each player has one scroll
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untear helping them like this picture to my left. this picture is what the drime league is all about. a big ear-to-ear smile. our team played in the world series in the little league in 2015. merica, makes our country so great. come to texas and watch a dream league game. see kids that are special because of what they can do and not because what they cannot do. batter up. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from rhode island seek recognition? >> permission to address the house and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. langevin: mr. speaker, today, we learned that the obama
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administration's decision to controls that could have been detrimental. i thank the president and specifically on this issue. in 2013. they added intrusion software. while the addition was well intentioned, and we don't want companies to make a profit. the language was too broad and cybersecurity tools and fundamental research. the plan to renegotiate is a month-long process and 124 of my coal etion in this chairman we are. i appreciate the work of the bureau of industry and the national security scounl for pushing for its resolution. we still have work to do. but today is our ability to come
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together, the government and industry to address difficult challenges in cybersecurity challenges. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? without objection the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise to tell the story of one of tens of thundershowers of women. because of these, she has lived in pain. she has lived in anxiety and she lived in sadness missing on school place because she was too sick and too tired. she lived in anger finding out that the coil was migrating and now

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